Spotlight

Spolight: An Analyst Prospective

I have not been given the prestige title of “Influencer” or “Twitter Expert.” What I do have is 13,000 investigative hours over a seven year period. As an All Source Analyst, who works as a private investigator on insurance claims and with law firms and insurance companies, I’ve specialized in intelligence, investigations, and data. I may not have a blue check mark, but I have worked a legal case…or two, or a thousand or so.

It frustrates me to no end witnessing this movement of “I feel it so it must be true.” If your morality is based upon feelings than your foundation is nothing more than sand. You lack an anchor, and are driven to and fro, just wherever the wind takes you. And when it comes to a court of law, your expression of outage and virtue signaling is meaningless. If not outright harmful.

What I want is justice. No one should have to be in fear of a police officer. Not now. Not ever. And what we all observed in that video of George Floyd being killed was horrific. But, yes, but, what is happening may sink his chances of having justice. And this makes me angry.

Issue: the case was racially motivated. Many seem to forget that in America, you are innocent until proven guilty. And it takes more than an accusation to make a charge stick. But Floyd was black and Chauvin was white! Yes. And? What does that prove? What evidence do you have to prove that Chauvin was racist? Police officers are notorious for not having a strong social media presence. I checked. He already scrubbed his. The fake accounts some of you have made will not help investigators. So what proof do you have that this was a racially motivated murder?

There was a lot of diversity among the officers on the scene. I did not hear any racial slurs during the video. Did I miss something? In a review of the footage, I see a proud, arrogant man kneeling on the neck of an “opponent” he had subdued. It was wrong, disturbing, and a disgusting display of pride. But racist? Can you prove it?

Then take into account that Chauvin was married to an immigrant from Thailand. A little research suggests her longtime friend was a director of diversity. He worked among a diverse crew of officers. Remember, on a jury of 12, the DA must convince them all. The defense only has to sow the seed of doubt into the mind of 1.

Issue: the elevation to 2nd degree murder may have sunk the case. And for those petitioning for 1st degree: stop. 1st degree murder implies Chauvin premeditated the killing. So, he knew Floyd would attempt to use a counterfeit bill? That a clerk would call the cops on him? And it would be during his beat? I want Chauvin to do time, not walk free.

Chauvin and Floyd worked together! Ok, and? I worked security at a massive retail store in the heart of one of the biggest cities in the country at one time. They regularly had police officers work a shift. I hung out with one of them. The rest of the security guys didn’t. Working security shifts (Floyd worked inside, Chauvin worked outside) does not prove 1st degree, premeditated murder. Did Chauvin stalk Floyd? Did he threaten him? Did he have a wall in his house dedicated to display his hate of Floyd? No? Then 1st degree won’t stick.

2nd degree doesn’t have a great chance either. Besides the police being protected by a powerful union that can afford incredible attorneys, 2nd degree means you must prove intent. Did Chauvin intend to kill Floyd? Can you prove it? Intention means motivation and inner thoughts. So where is your proof? Did Chauvin say it? Oh he mocked Floyd. But did he say he intended to kill him?

The “throat on neck” is a terrible submission technique. It tells me police officers need better martial arts training. However, this technique appears to be popular. I already witnessed another officer doing it to someone on video in the past week. Only the person didn’t die. If Chauvin can show it was a typical thing he did to a suspect resisting arrest, it will disprove intent to kill. Is it excessive? Yes. Is it an abuse of power? Yes. Is is poor training? Yes. Is it intent to murder? Do you think it will stick with a jury?

3rd degree murder was a perfect fit. It seemed likely and easily provable. But 2nd degree? 1st degree? The chances of an acquittal just rose significantly.

Issue: but we have video. Meaningless. I’ve done cases with hours and hours of footage. It meant nothing to the jury. There are juries that have been more impacted by an episode of CSI than actual evidence shown during trail. What has a greater impact? Probably the rioting and looting. Probably all the toxic craziness on social media. And, probably the character of Floyd. The defense will use this. The felony assault of a pregnant woman? Yep. The porn career? Yep. The use of a counterfeit bill? Yep. They will paint him as a dangerous subject. They have testimony the officers struggled for 10 minutes to get him into the vehicle. This will impact the jury.

The preliminary reports of the autopsy are out, but it will be a few weeks before the full report are ready. I’ve read hundreds of them. Right now we are hearing reports of drugs in his system, evidence of covid-19, and that he had a heart condition. If true, the defense will hire an expert to expound on these points. They only have to plant a seed of doubt in 1. That’s it.

There’s a conspiracy! A cover-up! You need to get used to the word allegedly. You need to prove allegations before you start flinging that term around. It works in political theater, but not in a court of law. It doesn’t help the case. I want justice. I don’t care about virtue signaling. I care that a man died over a fake $20 bill. I’m mad that a cop sat on his neck mocking the man as he died. But, did the cop know he was dying? Did the cop have enough justification to believe that Floyd was lying? Floyd was a big man. He had struggled for 10 minutes. Is this enough to create doubt in the minds of a jury?

Issue, the main issue: real change. We need unity. We need a foundation of truth that is built upon a rock that doesn’t blow away like sand. We need better trained officers and reforms to come to our local law enforcement agencies. We also need to remember that cops are people too. We need to eliminate racism wherever we find it, standing for truth and justice. We need to vote. To pray. To repent.

The upcoming court case will not be easy. I’ve worked on cases against police officers. They are not easy. You need to have an airtight case. Even then it might not be enough. And when the stakes are this high, you can’t afford to be wrong. But maybe the DA is just that good? I don’t know.

Well, those are my two cents as an analyst. If I were working this case, I’d work from the angle that Chauvin was a power mad cop who let his abuse of office get to his head. He’d committed more than a dozen abusive acts and nothing happened. He felt untouchable. He put himself above the law and violated his oath to office. He killed a man. So my research would be to prove this. To prove he was a prideful, violent, arrogant police officer.

This case could be used a centerpiece for driving reform in police departments across the country. A deep background on the officers may uncover a nugget or two. It only takes a single bread crumb to break a case wide open. So support whoever the investigators are working this case. And may justice be served.

One more issue: the other officers aided and abetted the murder. Did they? Does standing around constitute that? Again, feelings don’t matter. Did they fail to perform their function to serve and protect? Yes. But were they knowingly assisting in the murder of a man? Can you prove it beyond the shadow of doubt?

It won’t be easy. The peaceful protests do work. But don’t let it end there. Take action. Vote. Unite. Seek peace. Cry for justice. Make a difference. And don’t sink this case.

Spotlight – Tragedy Produces Crime

Liability cases can be tricky. Worked on a case once that turned from a AOE/COE into a subrogation once we uncovered the cause of death was a faulty support system installed by a 3rd party. Sadly, the death occurred just before Christmas. Another case involved a man who sued a major car maker because their car caught fire due to the man’s DUI influenced wreck. Still another saw a man lose his wife, of fourteen years, and his four children when the SUV exploded.

Yes, the cases are often sad. And sometimes, they include a twist. Like the time a malpractice lawsuit turned into a mafia operation. No joke.

Picture this: man goes into hospital with chest pains. County hospital misdiagnosed him (I’m not sure how they didn’t suspect a heart attack), and he dies. Family sues the country for a few million. I am tasked with checking in on businesses and assets on the deceased and his immediate family.

Here’s where it got weird. Ownership of all the businesses, all of which were involved in medical supplies, were being transferred to family friends. This included all the businesses which should have been owned by the subject’s spouse and children. Nope. Every business was transferred, and even the property deeds were being toyed with.

This case became so confusing I had to generate a data model to show all the relationships and connections between family and friends (including phone numbers, addresses, etc.). I also ended up doing bank searches and spot checks. I found some of businesses even changed their name or registered out of state.

The funny thing? They weren’t asking for more money. No, everything was being done to keep prying eyes away from their books. Allegedly, the entire thing was some sort of mafia racket. I didn’t stay on this case long enough to see it through. I handed over my findings to the county and we all went our merry ways. One of the craziest plot twists ever. Not the most insane though. I’ll leave that story of the vegetable turned real estate mogul for another day.

Spotlight – The Unknown Dad

The legal disputes and drama surrounding the death of a family member never cease to amaze me. One heir search was supposed to be easy: a man married for forty-six years to one woman and four kids. By the time I was done, I located sixteen total children spread across three mistresses in addition to his wife. So yeah, next of kin cases are messy.

This particular case I worked on involved the death of a minor. They weren’t even a teenager yet. The mother, “Jane,” had signed a sworn testimony that she had no idea who the father was. An important thing when it comes to claiming a hefty life insurance policy. Odd as well. Did she really not know who the father was?

I retrieved the birth and death certificate for the minor. Jane had made sure to list the father as “unknown” on both official documents. A geofence didn’t reveal much either. And a sweep of obituaries and memorials gave no mention of the father.

I ran family and probate searches, in addition to a marriage/divorce record sweep, focused on the county Jane presently resided in. She married a man a few years ago, even had more children, but her husband was not the father of the minor in question.

An initial social media search did not provide any further answers. So I kept digging, focusing on Jane’s siblings. And sure enough, one of her siblings posted a memorial video. About eight minutes into watching it, I noticed a 8-10 second clip of a man holding the minor. This man would turn out to be the father.

I went back through Jane’s address history, identified the possible counties she lived in around the birth of the minor, and ran another civi records search. No marriage or divorce records were found, but bingo – a child supper order.

The name of the father was listed on the order. I attempted to contact Child Support, but they are never very cooperative. Instead, I ran a social media on the father, confirmed his social media presence by matching multiple data points, linked him to Jane’s siblings, then reverse engineered his social media profiles so I could find his info on closed source databases.

Jane lived in California. The father was now living on the other side of the country with his wife. He was a registered sex offender (statuary rape between like a 19 year old and a 17 year old). This was likely why Jane thought it wouldn’t be a big deal. And he had been paying child support to Jane for years. In fact, the order was still active. Not only did she know who the father was, she had been receiving monthly checks from him!

So Jane had committed perjury in an attempt to collect all that life insurance. The result, of course, was being charged with insurance fraud. Still, extremely sad that a minor’s tragic death was overshadowed by such pettiness. But such is life.

Spotlight – You Got The Wrong Guy

The feeling hit me as soon as I finished putting in the request. When you have been doing cases as long as I have you learn to act on those gut feelings immediately. It only takes a single hunch to crack an investigation wide open. And in this case, it proved an accused man to be innocent.

So I put the asset and employment searches on hold. I conducted a second, more thorough read of a poorly written police report. The incident was a hit and run. Some damages to a vehicle, but no fatalities. No witnesses. Police looked into the case, but not much had been done. All we had was the license plate of a vehicle and the name (we will call him Jack) and the his alleged address.

The address came back to Military housing. A sweep of the area identified three subjects by the name of “Jack,” but only one had served in the military. A check of his military records showed he served his country for two years. He left the area some 9 months after leaving the military, and moved more than 3,000 miles away. His spouse finished her time in the military just 5 months after he did, and also left the area.

I then uncovered two clues: the vehicle involved in the hit and run had been sold right before Jack left the area. And Jack had bought a new vehicle just a couple months before leaving the area. A vehicle history run on his new vehicle placed that vehicle some 3,000 miles away at the time of the hit and run incident. The history also showed the subject had indeed left the area, and was still the owner of this newer vehicle. Additionally, a vehicle sighting report, in additional to a property deed owned by Jack and his spouse, proved the subject no longer resided in the area of the incident.

I ran the plates of the vehicle involved in the hit and run. I found multiple violations and citings since the vehicle had been last sold with multiple drivers and charges that included not having registration in the vehicle, not having motor vehicle insurance, and not driving with a valid license.

It turns out that Jack had sold this vehicle after leaving the military. His wife and him then moved far away and got on with their lives. However, the people they sold the vehicle to never turned in the paperwork to the DMV. Jack was still listed as the registered owner of the vehicle at the time of the hit and run.

Thankfully, I was able to prove that Jack had no involvement whatsoever with the hit and run. No need for an asset and employment check. He won’t be facing criminal charges or a lawsuit. Instead, we were able to narrow the field of suspects down to three individuals, making the lives of field investigators that much easier.

Morale of the story? Work on your discernment. Go with your gut. Don’t do something if it doesn’t feel right.