auto insurance

Spotlight – You Got The Wrong Guy

The feeling hit me as soon as I finished putting in the request. When you have been doing cases as long as I have you learn to act on those gut feelings immediately. It only takes a single hunch to crack an investigation wide open. And in this case, it proved an accused man to be innocent.

So I put the asset and employment searches on hold. I conducted a second, more thorough read of a poorly written police report. The incident was a hit and run. Some damages to a vehicle, but no fatalities. No witnesses. Police looked into the case, but not much had been done. All we had was the license plate of a vehicle and the name (we will call him Jack) and the his alleged address.

The address came back to Military housing. A sweep of the area identified three subjects by the name of “Jack,” but only one had served in the military. A check of his military records showed he served his country for two years. He left the area some 9 months after leaving the military, and moved more than 3,000 miles away. His spouse finished her time in the military just 5 months after he did, and also left the area.

I then uncovered two clues: the vehicle involved in the hit and run had been sold right before Jack left the area. And Jack had bought a new vehicle just a couple months before leaving the area. A vehicle history run on his new vehicle placed that vehicle some 3,000 miles away at the time of the hit and run incident. The history also showed the subject had indeed left the area, and was still the owner of this newer vehicle. Additionally, a vehicle sighting report, in additional to a property deed owned by Jack and his spouse, proved the subject no longer resided in the area of the incident.

I ran the plates of the vehicle involved in the hit and run. I found multiple violations and citings since the vehicle had been last sold with multiple drivers and charges that included not having registration in the vehicle, not having motor vehicle insurance, and not driving with a valid license.

It turns out that Jack had sold this vehicle after leaving the military. His wife and him then moved far away and got on with their lives. However, the people they sold the vehicle to never turned in the paperwork to the DMV. Jack was still listed as the registered owner of the vehicle at the time of the hit and run.

Thankfully, I was able to prove that Jack had no involvement whatsoever with the hit and run. No need for an asset and employment check. He won’t be facing criminal charges or a lawsuit. Instead, we were able to narrow the field of suspects down to three individuals, making the lives of field investigators that much easier.

Morale of the story? Work on your discernment. Go with your gut. Don’t do something if it doesn’t feel right.